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[Image Credits: develop-online.net]

“Models from Hell: How practical maquettes defined the original Doom…”

[Image Credits: develop-online.net]

[Image Credits: develop-online.net]

At the time, Greg Punchatz had a fledgling career in practical, make-up and animatronics special effects. Already he’d contributed to films such as A Nightmare on Elm Street 2, RoboCop and its sequels, and Coming to America. These were projects where Punchatz learnt from the likes of Rob Bottin, Phil Tippett and Rick Baker, some of the greatest special effects artists in the industry.“My dad told the guys at id, ‘My son does this this stuff for a living, you might want to give him a call!’” Punchatz tells us. After hearing from id Software artist Kevin Cloud, Punchatz visited the company to see the work in progress on Doom: “Frankly, I was blown away. This is how I had imagined a game always should be, walking around in three dimensions and battling creatures. It was really incredible to see.”Doom64_HellHoundPunchatz was immediately brought on to craft a stop-motion model of Doom’s final boss, the Spider Mastermind. It was a hideous brain-shaped creature on mechanical arachnid-like legs.‘Scary but over-the-top’ was Punchatz’s brief. He and a small team referenced id sketches and then fashioned a maquette out of an underlying steel armature, foam latex and a collection of somewhat rudimentary bits and pieces. “It was what I like to call a little bit rubber band and chewing gum effects,” suggests Punchatz. “The spider creature was made out of parts I had literally just found at hardware and hobby stores, pieces of Tupperware and PVC pipes. The main body started out as a sculpture, then a plaster mold was pulled from that. Then we made the armature to fit that mold, and then foam latex was injected inside the mould and put into an oven.”Revenant

Source: Models from Hell: How practical maquettes defined the original Doom | Develop