No Comments
[Image Credits: http://motherboard.vice.com]

“How Traditional Storytelling Is Ruining Virtual Reality Film”

[Image Credits: http://motherboard.vice.com]

[Image Credits: motherboard.vice.com]

Cinematic VR necessitates breaking the traditional construct of a linear story that hits certain beats: this happens, then this, then this. Good immersive content doesn’t just deviate from this pattern, it flips it on its head. Instead of plotting moments on a timeline, it builds a world for the viewer to experience on their own. Instead of trying to control what the viewer sees or feels, the filmmaker is sculpting a time in space, where everything that happens in between the beats is part of the story too.“It’s a spatial kind of storytelling, rather than a temporal,” said Paul Raphaël, the other half of Felix & Paul studios, which has created some of the best live-action VR I’ve seen to date, including Strangers and Wild.If a VR film is trying to get people to look where they’re supposed to, it’s already asking the wrong question, Jessica Brillhart, principal VR filmmaker at Google, told me over the phone. Brillhart, who gave a talk at Tribeca, has the enviable job of filming a ton of stuff with Google’s stereoscopic rig, Jump, to see what works and what doesn’t in VR filmmaking, and try to figure out what the language for this emerging artform will be.

Source: How Traditional Storytelling Is Ruining Virtual Reality Film | Motherboard