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“Marriage of academia and Aboriginal yarning”: Forgotten Legacy of Aboriginal Stockwomen

 

*****Advice: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers are advised that this story contains names and images people who have died.******

While the contribution of Aboriginal people to the pastoral industry has long been acknowledged, Ms Simone sensed a gap in the historical record.

“In the 1930s, you actually find lots of information about Aboriginal stockmen and their participation in the industry starts coming out,” she said.

“I thought ‘Well hang on, I know that the frontier started long before that’, so I went back to the 1860s and that’s when I found where the women were.”

During her research, Ms Simone created a method she called a “multi-relational narrative framework” where information was respectfully recorded in a marriage of academia and Aboriginal yarning.

The women involved were not merely participants, they were contributors to the work.

“I don’t see myself as owning it, I’m just that instrument for them to be able to contribute to this lack of knowledge that we have in Australian history so their voices can be heard,” Ms Simone said of the women’s stories.

“Aboriginal women are under-recognised and under-acknowledged for the participation that they’ve had, especially in the culture that has manifested today between non-Indigenous and Indigenous people within Australia.”

Source: Forgotten legacy of Aboriginal stockwomen becomes subject of PhD research – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)