2017 has so far been the year of the Honorable: in April, I was included in the MCV Pacific Women In Games “Game Changers” Honorable Mentions, while in January the lovely boffins at Dev Diner accolade-slapped me [heh] with an Honorable Nomination for my work in Virtual Reality [what a tingly-good way to start to the year, huh?].

In November 2016, I took up an invite from the digital arts organisation Rhizome to have work memorialized in their Net Art Anthology, a project that:

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“…takes on the complex task of identifying, preserving, and presenting exemplary works in a field characterized by broad participation, diverse practices, promiscuous collaboration, and rapidly shifting formal and aesthetic standards, sketching a possible net art canon.

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The New York Times describes this Net Art Anthology:

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“In addition to salvaging the past, the aim is to tell the story of Internet-based art in an online gallery that serves much the same narrative function as the galleries in the Museum of Modern Art.

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In October 2016, All the Delicate Duplicates won the Open Arcade Best Overall Game Award at the Game City Festival. #DelicateDuplicates [as our team has come to affectionately label it] also won the Tumblr International Prize for Digital Art and Media and The Space’s Open Call Commission. Danielle Strle, Director of Product for Community and Content at Tumblr, yayness-gushed this when awarding said Prize:

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“Awarding the Tumblr Prize to Mez and Andy is a total honor and we are excited to be a part of such a thrilling experiment that will foster our continued support of digital art and media.”

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In February 2017, we had a dazzling heap of All the Delicate Duplicates reviews, streaming, and general feedback thrown our way, some of which included:

“…incredibly effective storytelling that will stick with you long after the credits roll…All the Delicate Duplicates is one of the best games of the year.” – Rated “A” by Defunct Games:

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All the Delicate Duplicates has certainly left a mark. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my time with a game that I could see kick start a new form of storytelling.”Rated 9.3 out of 10, N3rdabl3
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“Spanning 19 years, the All the Delicate Duplicates story tells how Charlotte begins to find artistic comfort in the late Mo’s artifacts and unique scientific theories…with the vibes of Gone Home, Firewatch and the like… there is also a smidgen of Kitty Horrorshow’s eerie tales what with all the creepy ambient music, surreal landscapes and handwritten scrawls…” Rock, Paper, Shotgun
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“Those who have seen Stranger Things will be able to identify with All the Delicate Duplicates  rather well, given that they have the shared phenomenon of multiple universes coexisting at any given moment. The game toys with your interpretation and perception…it plays out rather like an episode of the Twilight Zone, spanning over two decades with each timeline adding a new layer of mystery and complexity to the narrative. The game doesn’t tell you where to go or present you with objectives; nor does it over-explain what is going on. It is down to you as an individual how much of the world you want to interact with, given that there a plethora of emails, text messages and random scribbles on the walls to read. If you interact with every single object, your understanding of the game obviously increases, such as the ever-increasing number of multi-universe and quantum physics-related books that appear as time progresses.  The developers ultimately rely on the player invested enough to read everything and explore each timeline fully. The result is a mind-boggling story told through a loose, non-linear narrative that challenges your perceptions and understanding of the game almost room-to-room. All the Delicate Duplicates  is available to buy here on Steam now!” Rated 8 out of 10, GameNora
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“Stunning and dramatic. You won’t be able to look away as this story unfolds around you.” – Rated 8 out of 10, The Digital Fix
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“This game is super-bizarre. I love everything about it, I just don’t know what’s happening…Shout out to the BBC for funding [it]. This game is the perfect F-U-up game. I’ll simply say you should play this.” – Jesse Cox and Jared Rosen [watch the entire hilarious streamed review here]:

 

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“Those familiar with The Vanishing of Ethan Carter or Dear Esther will find themselves feeling at home…until the game takes on a style of its own that is truly a marvel. All The Delicate Duplicates offers the kind of intrigue and immersion that so many of this genre of game strive for yet sadly fall short in.” – Rated 8 out of 10, Screenjabber
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“The more short games that I play, the more I’m really coming to appreciate little interactive fictions and experiences that can be completed in one sitting. Luminaries of such form might include Journey and Limbo and Firewatch, and it’s safe to count All the Delicate Duplicates amongst such company as well. All The Delicate Duplicates is refreshing simply because it works the brain in ways that few other games even bother to try. It’s certainly a game that sticks with you.” – Rated 8.2 out of 10, Fuzzy Pixels
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#PRISOM Deets>>

In June 2016, “The Biopolitics of Electronic Literature: On the Writings of Mez Breeze” gave a good crack at analysing #PRISOM, a game designed for wearable Augmented Reality displays, with the author Kent Aardse writing:

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“If #PRISOM were to only accomplish one thing (and to be clear, it accomplishes much more), it is to foster a more discerning, critical player; in this case, the goal is for the user to walk away from the experience more aware of her interactions and experiences online.”

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#PRISOM was exhibited at the very first dedicated Augmented Reality exhibition in Australia [first! first! etc! blah], and was:

 Commissioned for the 2013 International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality Exhibition “Transreal Topologies” in conjunction with the South Australian University’s Wearable Computer Lab, and the Royal Institution of Australia [big shoutout to busy-beaverish Julian Stadon here].

Made the Finals of the 2014 Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards in the “Digital Narrative” Category [you’re probably now thinking: a book award for a narrative game project – weird, right?].

Nominated in the Digital Humanities Awards for “Best Visualization or Infographic” Category. [It didn’t win, but don’t worry, we were gracious losers.]

Showcased at the 2015 Not Games Fest hosted by the Cologne Game Lab’s Institute for Game Development/Research at the Cologne University of Applied Sciences [yay + more yay].

Featured at Transitio_MX06 alongside acclaimed game projects such as The Stanley Parable, Papers, Please and Atari-Noise [such amazingly shiny projects, these].

Demoed at the 2015 International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling.

Complimented to the nth-degree by the indubitable James O’Sullivan, who says:

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“…#PRISOM is the digital equivalent of Orwell’s 1984.”

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Also in June my interactive fiction “A [[Non]] Guardian Age”, commissioned by if:book Australia, was shortlisted in the Western Australian Premier Book Awards in the Digital Narrative category.

"ANGA" Shortlisted for the 2016 Western Australia Premier's Book Awards

July 2016 saw our Inanimate Alice team being twinkle-graced with an Honorable Mention for all our hard work on “Inanimate Alice, Episode 6: The Last Gas Station” as part of The Robert Coover Award for a Work of Electronic Literature.

“Inanimate Alice: The Last Gas Station" Digital Fiction 2016

From July – October 2016, I had the pleasure of performing as a Juror for the Exhibition arm of the 2016 International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling.

By the way, have I mentioned before that I was a Founding Contributor at ARGology, the International Game Developers Association’s Alternate Reality Games SIG? No? It provides:

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“…much needed information about alternate reality games for developers, journalists, researchers and players”.

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As a Founding Member of the Third Faction Collective, I’ve also exhibited [fangrrl-squealing all the while] with Blizzard Entertainment, Eddo Stern, Tale of Tales, and Chris Metzen at the 2009 “World of Warcraft: Emergent Media Phenomenon” Laguna Show.

 

And finally in May 2017, the amazing elit champions Davin Heckman (Winona State University) and James O’Sullivan (University of Sheffield) stated in the sparklingly relevant article “Electronic Literature: Contexts and Poetics”:

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“[All the Delicate] Duplicates is as beautiful as it is technically impressive, and it is a signal of how artists like Breeze and Campbell are drawing electronic literature in from the outskirts of the canon—this is a work that has been recognised with mainstream accolades…These are both the present and future of electronic literature—a future that possesses forms we cannot even begin to anticipate.”

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