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[Image Credits: The Chinese Room via pcgamesn.com]

Talking ‘Walking Sims’ With The Chinese Room’s Dan Pinchbeck

[Image Credits: The Chinese Room via pcgamesn.com]

[Image Credits: The Chinese Room via pcgamesn.com]

To think there was a time when a game like Dear Esther was seen as a radical concept. One so against the grain that it actually left some players enraged and decrying that its very existence was harmful to videogames. Ostensibly, there’s very little for you to do in Dear Esther. It’s a calm and pensive experience that leaves you free to explore a gorgeously painted Hebridean island – from its sandy beaches and grassy knolls at twilight to its sparkly and enigmatic cave systems. As you wander a narrator reads brief snippets of letters to his deceased wife, Esther, which you can piece together to build the game’s story…That is the crux of walking sims. They are so open to interpretation, so dependent on the attitude of the player as much as the quality of the game on offer. What Pinchbeck says next is easy to agree with if you’ve had the misfortune of playing Bad Rats or Ride to Hell: Retribution. “I’d prefer to play something which is questionably a game but is good, rather than something which is undoubtedly a game and is shit.”…
[Image Credits: The Chinese Room via pcgamesn.com]

[Image Credits: The Chinese Room via pcgamesn.com]

So, as Pinchbeck says, these games are divisive and it looks like they will continue to be so. Perhaps, one day, the debate will pass and we’ll all be able to get on enjoying what we enjoy in peace. Nevertheless, looking ahead to future games from The Chinese Room – as well as the likes of Tacoma, A Light in Chorus and All the Delicate Duplicates – the walking sim will continue to test both our limits and our definitions.

Source: Talking ‘walking sims’: The Chinese Room’s Dan Pinchbeck on the pointlessness of the debate | PCGamesN